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Sacramento Partition Lawyer

Partition Actions in Sacramento

Sacramento is the capital of California and the seat of Sacramento County. It is located at the confluence of the Sacramento River and the American River in the northern portion of California’s expansive Central Valley. It is the sixth-largest city in California and the 35th largest in the United States. Sacramento is known for its diverse culture, vibrant nightlife, and its many parks and museums. It is home to the California State Capitol, the Crocker Art Museum, the California State Railroad Museum, and the Sacramento Zoo. The city is also home to a number of professional sports teams, including the Sacramento Kings of the NBA and the Sacramento River Cats of the Pacific Coast League.

According to Zillow, the median home value in Sacramento, California is $372,400 as of 2021. As of July 2020, the population of the Sacramento metropolitan area is estimated to be 2,296,418.

Experienced Real Estate Partition Action Attorneys Serving Sacramento

Talkov Law’s attorneys serving Sacramento County are exceptionally experienced in the area of California partition actions. California partition actions provide a legal mechanism for co-owners of real property to divide the property among themselves. The partition statutes allow a co-owner to file a lawsuit in court to have the property divided, either physically or by awarding each co-owner a certain percentage of the property’s value. The court will then order the property to be divided according to the co-owners’ wishes. The partition statutes also provide that if the court finds that a physical division of the property is not feasible, it may order the property to be sold and the proceeds divided among the co-owners.

Our team of partition attorneys can assist co-owners with frequently asked questions about partitions, such as:

  • What are my partition rights for inherited property? Co-owners of inherited property generally have the absolute right to force the sale of the property through a partition action.
  • What are the steps involved in a partition action in California? The first step is to file a partition complaint in California, which is followed by a request for the court to enter an interlocutory judgment of partition, thereby appointing a partition referee under the partition statutes.
  • Can heirs force the sale of property? Heirs can force the sale of real property in California once that property is distributed to them. However, sometimes, the property is still held in a trust where the trustee will sell the property. When there is no trust, the probate court may decide that the probate administrator will sell the property before it is distributed in fractional interests to the heirs.
  • Can we negotiate a settlement instead of going through a partition action? We find that the best solution is to file the partition action, then negotiate a settlement. Defendants often reach a more reasonable settlement when they are being advised by a partition attorney who will explain that the plaintiff is very likely to obtain the sale of the property.
  • When is a partition action right for my dispute? Generally, parties who can reach their own resolution of a co-ownership dispute are not reading websites about partition law. If you are reading this article, chances are that your co-ownership dispute has reached a level where legal options are being considered. Filing a partition action will bring about a certain result to the co-ownership dispute, rather than letting it linger for years on end. However, if the parties are very close to a settlement, it may be wise to consider a resolution.

Speak to Our Sacramento Partition Attorneys Today

Call our Sacramento County Partition Attorneys today to end your co-ownership dispute. You don’t pay until the house is sold!

Call us at (916) 668-3300 or contact us below to schedule a free, 15-minute consultation

    Bartlett v. Mackey – Partition Action Case Study

    In the legal case of Bartlett v. Mackey, 130 Cal. 181 (1900), the California Supreme Court was asked to decide whether a partition of real property was valid. The dispute arose when two brothers, William and John Mackey, inherited a parcel of land from their father. William wanted to keep the land intact, while John wanted to divide it into two separate parcels. The court held that the partition was valid, but that William was entitled to compensation for the value of the land he was giving up. The court also held that the partition should be made in such a way that each brother would receive an equal share of the land. The court’s decision established the principle that when two or more people own real property, they can divide it into separate parcels, but that the division must be made in a fair and equitable manner.

    Contact our Team of Experienced Partition Lawyers Serving the City of Sacramento in the County of Sacramento, California.

    Our partition litigation attorneys will work diligently to obtain a favorable outcome on your behalf, whether by negotiation or litigation. Call the experienced real estate partition attorneys at Talkov Law at (916) 668-3300 or contact us online for a free consultation about your co-ownership issues.

    Talkov Law Sacramento Office

    500 Capitol Mall, Suite 2350
    Sacramento, CA 95814
    Phone: (916) 668-3300

    Our partition attorneys in Sacramento also serve Midtown, Downtown, Land Park, East Sacramento, Curtis Park, Oak Park, Natomas, Arden-Arcade, Carmichael, Fair Oaks, Elk Grove, Roseville, Folsom, and West Sacramento.

    Talkov Law is Rated 5 out of 5 stars based on 53 customer reviews.

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